August 12, 2020

Rule 8. Think Like a Client. Help Control Costs.

Rule 8 is Think Like the Client--Help Control Costs. The 2006 Explanatory Note for Rule 8--we reluctantly decided that an Advisory Committee Notes regime was a bit grandiose--begins this way:

Ask an associate lawyer or paralegal what a "profit" is. You will get two kinds of answers. Both answers are "correct" but neither of them helps anyone in your firm think like the client. The answers will be something like this. (1) "A profit is money remaining after deducting costs from receipts." This is the correct young transactional/tax lawyer answer. Or (2) "it's money left over at the end of the hunt." This is the correct fire-breathing young litigator answer.

The right answer?

A profit is a reward for being efficient. And until a lawyer, paralegal or staffer gets that, she or he will never know how a client--or a law firm partner--thinks.

notre-dame-gargoyles-granger.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Blaise Pascal: Time and Brevity.

I have only made this letter longer because I have not had the time to make it shorter.

― Blaise Pascal (1623-1662), The Provincial Letters, Letter 16, 1657

6474C51F-5E7C-4A67-9770-2861BC7A3304.jpeg
By François II Quesnel for Gérard Edelinck, 1691

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 11, 2020

Sainte Genevieve (422-512): “I know it, I see it. The Huns will not come.”

Sainte Genevieve (422-512) saved Parisians from the Huns, the legend goes, in 451. People had started to flee Paris in anticipation of the invasion led by Attila--but stopped when she told them she had a vision that the Huns would not enter Paris. “Get down on your knees and pray! I know it, I see it. The Huns will not come.“ She became the city's patron saint. In 1928, a grateful Paris erected a statue to her on the Pont de la Tournelle (now about 400 years old). Genevieve is facing east, the direction from which the Huns approached. She is also said to have converted Clovis, king of the pagan Franks, to Christianity. If you walk from the Right Bank to the Left Bank near the Ile Saint Louis, you walk right under her, with Notre Dame on your right.

Ste_genevieve_st_etienne.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Hunter Thompson: On Quality Time.

Excerpt from the famous November 1974 Playboy Magazine interview with writer and humorist Hunter S. Thompson conducted by Craig Vetter, a well-regarded writer and storyteller himself.

PLAYBOY: ....this morning you've had two bloody marys, three beers and about four spoons of some white substance and you've been up for only an hour. You don't deny that you're heavily into drugs, do you?

THOMPSON: No, why should I deny it? I like drugs. Somebody gave me this white powder last night. I suspect it's cocaine, but there's only one way to find out...

PLAYBOY: What do you like best?

THOMPSON: Probably mescaline and mushrooms: That's a genuine high. It's not just an up -- you know, like speed, which is really just a motor high. When you get into psychedelics like mescaline and mushrooms, it's a very clear kind of high, an interior high. But really, when you're dealing with psychedelics, there's only one king drug, when you get down to it, and that's acid. About twice a year you should blow your fucking tubes out with a tremendous hit of really good acid. Take 72 hours and just go completely amok, break it all down.

Early-03-Self-Portrait-Puerto-Rico-circa-1960s.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 10, 2020

The Dog Days of Summer: It was never just about the heat.

rw0065s.jpg

August 10, 2020. Monday. The Summer Heat. Day in day out every day. It never stops. Especially, lately, we complain. Maybe Al Gore was right about something?

But it’s been going on a while. A long while. In fact, the six week period between July 1 and August 15 was named by the both the ancient Greeks and the early Romans after Sirius, the Dog Star, the brightest star in the sky. In the Mediterranean region, the notion of linking that star to oppressively hot summer weather dates back well over 2700 years. 27 hot summer centuries.

And these Dog Days of Summer wasn't always just about the heat.

If you are feeling not just hot but a bit strange, maybe confused or otherwise out of sorts this time of year--and you're not too much of a whack-job or flake to begin with--you may be on to something. Dog days of summer was also associated with Chaos: "the seas boiled, wine turned sour, dogs grew mad and all creatures became languid, causing to man burning fevers, hysterics and phrensies." Brady's Clavis Calendarium, 1813.

Chaos had a good side, too. Just two thousand years ago, and after he had given up the study of law that his family had foisted on him, Ovid (43 B.C.-17 A.D.), the playful poet writing during Octavian's long reign, gave us a more famous--and less grim--take on Chaos in Book I of Metamorphoses. Chaos, he thought, might be the best possible starting point for anything worthwhile. But you will need to read Ovid yourself. Preferably alone--in a cool, calm, quiet and well-lighted place.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Slavery Today

This is slavery, not to speak one's thought.

— Eurípides (480-406 BC)


F566F197-B2EF-45B1-A867-7D00C0870E6B.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Hotel du Jeu de Paume.

hotel-jeu-de-paume-jq23k5.jpg

Hotel du Jeu de Paume, 54 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île, 75004 Paris

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 09, 2020

The 12 Rules of Client Service.

chimeracity (1).jpg

1. Represent only clients you like.

2. The client is the main event.

3. Make sure everyone in your firm knows the client is the main event.

4. Deliver legal work that changes the way clients think about lawyers.

5. Over-communicate: bombard, copy and confirm.

6. When you work, you are marketing.

7. Know the client.

8. Think like the client--help control costs.

9. Be there for clients--24/7.

10. Be accurate, thorough and timely--but not perfect.

11. Treat each co-worker like he or she is your best client.

12. Have fun.

Copyright 2006-2020 John Daniel Hull, IV. All Rights Reserved.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

The 7 Habits of Highly Clueless Corporate Lawyers.

Return of EFGB and the Seven Habits. Lawyers who won't take a stand is a time-honored tradition. Ernie from Glen Burnie, a life-long friend of mine, is not such a creature. It's just his nature. He'll stand up for people who pay him--and people he just met on the subway. You can read Ernie's story. It's about an old parchment he claims was discovered in Alexandria, Virginia, around the same time we both began practicing law in the District. Do see "The Seven Habits of Highly Useless Corporate Lawyers". This is a true story, mostly. So listen up.

jack-kerouac-y-neal-cassady.jpg

Stand-Up Guys: Ernie, a dead-ringer for 1950s icon Neal Cassady, and the author, during their pre-lawyer years in Washington, D.C.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 07, 2020

Storytelling.

Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.

--Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)

20080212_chekhov_33.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 05, 2020

Yeats on Writing.

Out of the quarrel with others we make rhetoric; out of the quarrel with ourselves we make poetry.

--W.B. Yeats (1865–1939)

image.php (1).jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Writing Well: The Editors.

"No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else's draft." --H.G. Wells (1866-1946)

"I have performed the necessary butchery. Here is the bleeding corpse." --Henry James (1843-1916)after a request by the Times Literary Supplement to cut 3 lines from a 5,000 word article.

h-g-wells.png

Herbert George Wells, 1908

Posted by Holden Oliver (Kitzbühel Desk). Permalink | Comments (1)

The Resurrection, Piero della Francesca,1463.

3729E806-17C9-4797-87C3-EA93A26AA583.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (1)

August 04, 2020

Real Women: Natalie Portman.

natalie-portman.jpg

“You don't need the money with a face like that.” Born in Jerusalem in the summer of 1981, she is a citizen of both Israel and America, And wow. Natalie Portman has just turned 39. Ten years ago, based on a performance she gave at age 28, she won the best actress Oscar for her performance in Black Swan. She’s also a 2003 Harvard grad. A film and stage actress at an early age (she was “discovered” at the age of 10), she was a serious and precocious child. Ambitious. She has loved languages since she was a schoolgirl growing up in New York and DC. She’s studied French, Japanese, German and Arabic. She’s been in our WAC/P Pantheon since 2015.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Knoxville, Tennessee

Since the mid-1930s, the Big Dog in Knoxville has been the federally-owned Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), America's biggest public power provider. $11.8 billion annually with 12,000 employees. TVA's service area: Tennessee, parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Kentucky, and smaller pieces of Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia.

578px-SiegeofKnoxville.jpg
Knoxville from the south bank of the Tennessee River after the end of Siege of Knoxville. Photo: George N. Barnard, December 1863.

Posted by Holden Oliver (Kitzbühel Desk). Permalink | Comments (0)

August 03, 2020

Cancel Ben Franklin.

77727EA4-2B3C-4C99-8261-D7354AA191FA.jpeg


#DefundBen

Slave Owner.

Womanizer (World Class, too).

Rebel.

Founding Father.

Writer.

Inventor.

Sage.

Wit.

Polymath.

Genius.

All-Round Badass.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 02, 2020

Robert Frost: Work-Life Pulitzer.

The difference between a job and a career is the difference between forty and sixty hours a week.

Robert Frost (1874-1963) spent his life as a poet, student, teacher, newspaper reporter, farmer, factory worker, father, husband and accomplished Yankee. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize four times.

460px-Robert_Frost_NYWTS_4.jpg
(New York World-Telegram & Sun)

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 01, 2020

The 12 Rules of Client Service.

Our world-famous 12 Rules of Client Service. Revel in their wisdom. Ignore them at your peril. Teach them to your coworkers. Argue about them. Improve them.

Wldbill scoul.jpg

Posted by Holden Oliver (Kitzbühel Desk). Permalink | Comments (0)

Writing Well: Editors.

I have performed the necessary butchery. Here is the bleeding corpse.

--Henry James (1843-1916), after a request by the Times Literary Supplement to cut 3 lines from a 5,000 word article.

james.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

August 2020

Good morning.

August 1, 2020.

Half of America is batshit crazy.

The other half won’t talk about it.

They might lose their jobs.

A11983CB-2906-4AE3-B626-271F3CCA149A.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

American Folkway.

Confederate flags aren’t hate symbols or swastikas. Learn American history, culture, folkways and geography. Get culturally literate. Most Americans aren’t small-minded, easily offended or whiny victims. Let’s get back to that.


01A406B4-A362-4D12-A463-1F4840C08D06.jpegPosted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 31, 2020

“The Calling of the Apostles Peter and Andrew” (from the Maestà), Duccio, 1311

06C0BECE-3945-4DF7-A2CC-CF5AC37CC805.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 30, 2020

Edward I: Longshanks, the Scots and the Stone of Scone.

Apud Monasterium de Scone positus est lapis pergrandis in ecclesia Dei, juxta manum altare, concavus quidam ad modum rotundae cathedreaie confectus, in quo future reges loco quasi coronatis.

--14th century English cleric Walter Hemingford

An oblong block of red sandstone known as The Stone of Scone (or Scottish coronation stone) was already ancient and storied when Edward I "captured" it" in 1296 as a spoils of war. Edward took it to Westminster Abbey. There it was fitted into a wooden chair, known as King Edward's Chair. Most subsequent English sovereigns have been crowned on it.

The combative and opinionated Edward, who spent much of his reign taming and subjugating the Scots, and hated them, once referred to the Stone as "a turd".

Seven hundred years after Edward lifted the Stone from the Scots, on July 3, 1996, the British House of Commons finally ordered that the Stone would be returned. It was handed over to Scotland in November of that year at the England-Scotland border and taken to Edinburgh Castle. It will remain in Scotland except for future coronations at Westminster Abbey in London.

ib56corch1.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 29, 2020

The Governess, 1739, Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin (1699-1779)

EC30310B-68C5-4E8C-86FA-36F91CCEA0CB.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Attack of the Muppets, Part XXIX

08E202FF-C9A9-41E6-B17F-FCD1C6FCF7B1.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 28, 2020

The Best of Partner Emeritus: "I own a dog so I can understand how to be patient with associates."

If you work for a peer firm, you will encounter me or someone very much like me. [Y]ou cannot avoid the essence of my character if you aspire to succeed... I or some form of my embodiment will exist to make your existence as uncomfortable and unpleasant as it can be. Welcome to the legal profession you self-entitled nimrods have created.

--Partner Emeritus, commenting at Above The Law, 2009

To the dismay of many, Partner Emeritus, the urbane, well-heeled lawyer, writer, satirist, culture critic, enemy of the militantly mediocre and hands-down Dean Swift of Above the Law's wise if wonderfully deranged Commentariat, has caught this blog's attention. With humility and honor, we today announce that "Best of Partner Emeritus" will be a feature and its own category here at What About Clients/Paris? Probably forever.

Among other subjects, we will spotlight PE's views on dogs, lawyers, brothels, sexual techniques and remedial programs for broken GenY JDs with Tourettes, Sydenham's chorea and/or lifelong spine problems.

We begin simply. We love a short but busy comment PE just made about his dog Simeon and his love for dogs--which for our money are about the best thing on this fourth-rate planet anyway. It follows from yesterday's ATL piece, Prosecutor’s Pooch Spawns Epic Email Bitchfest by ATL's founder, ageless boy wonder and polymath David Lat:

Everyone here on ATL knows I am a dog lover. In the early '90s, a German colleague suggested that I own a dog so I can understand how to be patient with associates. I purchased my first Afghan hound, the late Algernon, in 1995 and I trained him to be a show dog champion. Algernon then sired my current canine companion, Simeon, who was a favorite to win the 2008 Westminster Dog Show before someone sabotaged his chances by slipping contaminated food in his kennel the night before the competition commenced.

This all being said, the AUSA who complains about doing his job on the weekend is in the wrong here. The workplace is not his home and he simply cannot act as if he were home (e.g., take off his mustard stained chinos and walk around in his underwear, etc.). Moreover, what if the dog bites a co-worker? Can the co-worker file a workman's compensation claim or does the lout who brought his dog to the office have separate liability insurance for the dog? As much as I detest government bureaucrats, I have to side with the dragon lady office manager in this dogfight.

Afghan-Hound-Black-Free-Picture.jpg
Simeon cruising London's Hyde Park?

The Best of Partner Emeritus: Introduction/No. 1

Original post September 15, 2015

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (1)

July 27, 2020

Tyrannies

29A98E27-4AAC-497A-AF1F-408CBE3C12D7.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Rest in peace, Ms. Melanie Hamilton. We didn’t deserve you.

3A51DA66-D310-49D6-B656-304D4E9C55E1.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 26, 2020

La Peste

“....the day would come again when, for the bane and the enlightening of men, it would rouse up its rats again and send them forth to die in a happy city.”

— The Plague (1948)

E2D74531-9B43-4300-8F41-1B4F6EC61068.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Mysteries of the Handwritten Thank-You Note

the-governess.jpg
The Governess, 1739, Jean-Baptiste-Simeon Chardin (1699-1779)

In case your Governess never told you, you're from Utah, or you were stoned all seven years at Andover, please remember that when thanking anyone for something important--a meeting, referral or a dinner--do it and do it promptly with a handwritten thank-you note. We all fail here from time to time. Yet no valid excuses exist for not writing short prompt notes.

Too few of us practice gratitude, in either business or our "other" lives, enough. Some say the practice of saying thanks is good for the soul. Others swear it's good for revenues, too. Many business people and some lawyers with the highest standards taste (i.e., wear socks to meetings or court) think that no written thank-you note means no class--as harsh and low-tech as that may sound.

Typed is okay--but handwritten is better. Even if you are not convinced that thank-you notes are noticed and appreciated (they are), pretend that we know more than you (we do), and do it anyway (thank us later). Good stationery. We suggest Crane's on the lower end, or something better, like stationery from Tiffany's, or a Tiffany-style knock-off, on the higher end. A "studio card", maybe. Plain. Simple. Initials on it at most.

Continue reading...

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 25, 2020

Jonathan Swift

Swift was a Titan in rebellion against Heaven.

-- John L. Stoddard, 1901

Anglo-Irish, Angry and Brave: See one of our past tributes to Dean Swift (1667–1745) in "Heroes and Leaders: Anyone out there with soul and sand?"

J. Swift portrait.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Bouguereau’s Return from the Harvest, 1878

3E3BB201-98C5-4649-B113-7095954EDEF1.jpeg

William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905), Return from the Harvest, 1878. Cummer Art Museum, Jacksonville

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Secret Police.

Folks, if you have trouble with federal secret police manhandling protestors, demonstrators and dissidents, maybe Socialism just isn’t for you. Stick to the old bourgeois system.

D32848EA-4BE1-4F3C-84A6-A002ADC2B202.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Best of Partner Emeritus No. 5. PE Does 'Nam, Cassandra, others (Part II)

I guarantee you one thing. If you work for a peer firm, you will encounter me or someone very much like me. Either way, you cannot avoid the essence of my character if you aspire to succeed at a peer firm. I or some form of my embodiment will exist to make your existence as uncomfortable and unpleasant as it can be.

-- Partner Emeritus, New York City, September 3, 2009

Faithful Above The Law readers know that a 1967 polo injury two weeks before his deployment to Officer Candidate School at Fort Benning, Georgia sidelined Partner Emeritus, later a celebrated patrician New York City law partner, and now revered Dean of the ATL Commentariat, for the entire Vietnam War. This deprived America not only of hundreds more enemy kills during the war's escalation years also of an early and victorious end to the war. "My endgame would have been to round up all the hippie stoners and opium addicts in the States and parachuted them into Vietcong territory," he recently explained. "I would have used the MK Ultra Program to convince the paratroopers that the Vietcong had stolen their drugs and that the opium fields would be their prize for killing every last member of Charlie." Like every great jungle fighter, major corporate exec and bet-the-company trial lawyer, and every generation of males in my own family in America since 1634, Partner Emeritus took the setback in stride and, in a word, improvised.

Here is a bit of military trivia for you. During the early part of the Vietnam War, I used to go to Fort Totten and Fort Hamilton when families and girlfriends were seeing off their "boys" getting shipped to 'Nam. I befriended many young nubile women under the guise that I was a returning veteran who just finished a tour in 'Nam. I almost feel ashamed to admit that I seduced many of these women. It was really easy, especially when I would tell them that the average American G.I. fornicated with diseased Vietnamese whores 3 or 4 times a week.

During an intimate interlude, "Cassandra" received a phone call from her G.I. boyfriend named John, who was on R&R in Singapore. She proceeded to have a conversation with John as she performed fellatio on me. Unfortunately, I could not discipline myself during climax and I exulted loudly in ecstasy. Well John heard me and angrily demanded an explanation. "Cassie" told John that her girlfriend "Jody" was visiting her and she was moaning over menstrual cramps.

A few years later, I discovered that I was immortalized in military folklore when drill instructors warn recruits that while they are suffering in boot camp, their girlfriends back home are being taken care of "Jody."


Ain't no sense in goin' home, Jody's got your girl and gone. Ain't no sense in feeling blue, Jody's got her sister, too.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Melissa Jane Holt Hull (1845-1918)

Melissa Jane Holt Hull (1845-1918). Born and died in Mountain Grove, MO. Of English stock in America since early 1700s. Raised 7 Hulls, including my great-grandfather John Daniel Hull I. Lost her home twice during the Civil War. Her father John Holt was killed at age 48 working in his fields in 1862. Shot in the back. Died amongst family on kitchen floor of his house. Bled to death. She was 16. In post-war years, she helped get my family through its worst years since our arrival in Virginia from Germany in 1750.


375C1B4C-BB04-4487-9C5B-C844B7F15264.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Euripides on Speech and Expression.

This is slavery, not to speak one's thought.

— Eurípides (480-406 BC)

Creon-and-his-dying-daughter-Creus-400x518.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 24, 2020

Practicing law? It's never about you, Jack.

From a comment--the kind of comment we've been making here since 2005--I made on ATL Surrogate this morning about advice to new associate lawyers:

Practicing law is never about you.

Learn how to be good lawyer on those sporadic and few but inevitable days when the worse possible things are happening to you personally and/or professionally or around you. I.e., Your car breaks down on the middle of the 14th Street Bridge one morning. You are sick. A child or parent is sick. Your wife just left you. Someone close to you dies. You just received some bad news about a certain case.

A client--any client--will still come first. You really don't get to have a bad day.

Seghersjob.jpg

The Patient Job, Gerard Seghers (1591–1651). National Gallery in Prague.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Aristippus (435-360 BC): Go Somewhere Different. Meet Someone Different.

A wise man's country is the world.

--Aristippus (435-360 BC), as quoted by Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

aristippus.jpg

"There is hope. I see traces of men." Aristippus was shipwrecked on the island of Rhodes in the Aegean Sea. He and his fellow survivors did not know where they were or if the island was inhabited. But he sees geometric figures drawn on the sand.

Posted by Holden Oliver (Kitzbühel Desk). Permalink | Comments (0)

The Church of the Epiphany, Washington, D.C. 1844.

Right altar. North side. The Church of the Epiphany (Episcopalian). Built 1844. 13th and G Streets, Northwest. United States.Senator Jefferson F. Davis (D-Mississippi) and his family worshiped here in Pew No. 14 from 1846 until 1861. 2:30 PM June 5, 2019.

2FD30E5C-78F5-4B1D-B678-5D6B7C928C1F.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 23, 2020

Jack London: On Real Life

‪“You can’t wait for Inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.”‬

‪— Jack London (1876-1916)‬


‪Image: London in 1905‬
4E2E8EEA-BCC9-4229-85BC-FFD544380AFB.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 22, 2020

Anton Chekov: Storytelling.

Don't tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.

--Anton Chekhov (1860-1904)

20080212_chekhov_33.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Writing Well: What's at Stake?

“You and your firm are judged by every piece of writing that goes out the door.”

--A wise person, possibly Dan White, lawyer-writer-humorist

henrymiller.jpg
Henry Miller, American writer (1891-1980)

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 21, 2020

Amarcord

2FA2A0C4-4D1B-4F97-840B-F4B3D40D42D9.jpeg
November 22, 1963. A Friday. 2:40 PM Central Time. Air Force One. Dallas. Federal Judge Sarah Hughes (N.D. Tex.) swore him in.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Rule 6: When You Work, You Are Marketing.

gargoyle.jpg

When you work, you are marketing. You are constantly sending the customer small but powerful ads. Rule Six comes from our hopelessly arrogant and deeply infuriating but consistently right, practical, and world-famous 12 Rules of Client Service.

Posted by Holden Oliver (Kitzbühel Desk). Permalink | Comments (0)

The New “Liberals.”

Not one of my political views, cultural values or causes have changed since 1974. But I’m now called a Racist at least weekly. I’ve not met a single liberal Dem in DC since I got back here in 2015. Not one. The new Left and its new “liberalism” is intolerant, poorly-educated, small-minded, prissy and illiberal. They are not liberals. They are not even close.


D98DAB17-0E2A-490C-AEDE-FBF46DF827C3.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 20, 2020

The Truth.

#SpeechAndExpression

Use it or lose it.

You’ve Nothing without it.

Zilch. Zero. Nada. Nothing.

Good Speech. Bad Speech. Mean Speech. Loving Speech.

It’s Everything.

Everything.

60DB1C24-F2EE-4D70-93B1-0857FC3511ED.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Ocean

‪“Singing to an ocean, I can hear the ocean's roar‬
‪Play for free, I play for me and play a whole lot more...‬
‪Singing about the good things and the sun that lights the day‬
‪I used to sing on the mountains, has the ocean lost its way?”‬

-~ R. Plant/J. Page, 1973

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

#PortlandBeaversMatter

C5F9DA26-5274-4092-99EE-3F139169FA9C.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 19, 2020

Pointe Aux Barques (est. 1896)

Pointe 5.gif

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 18, 2020

Consider Swift.

Swift was a Titan in rebellion against Heaven.

-- John L. Stoddard, 1901

J. Swift portrait.jpg

Anglo-Irish, Angry and Brave: See one of our past tributes to Dean Swift (1667–1745) in "Heroes and Leaders: Anyone out there with soul and sand?"

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Perfectionism: The Horror. The Horror.

Clients pay for excellent--not for perfect. Excellent is way harder.

Clients 99.5% of the time are not paying you to be perfect. Clients don't want perfect. In the rare instances they do want perfect, they will let you know. So clients want excellent. Be excellent, not perfect. Got it? See, e.g., Rule 10: Be Accurate, Thorough and Timely--But Not Perfect of our repetitive and irritating but life-changing 12 Rules of Client Service.

aaaheart-darkness-joseph-conrad-paperback-cover-art_1254.jpg
The Horror. The Horror.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 17, 2020

James Baldwin’s “Tell Me How Long The Train's Been Gone."

126135.jpg

An essayist at heart, American novelist, poet and playwright James Baldwin (1924-1987) wrote his experimental fourth novel about the life of Leo Proudhammer, a black stage actor raised in Harlem who moves to Greenwich Village. Proudhammer has a heart attack on stage. Published in 1968, and panned by critics but widely read, "Tell Me How Long The Train's Been Gone" is an incredibly intense coming of age story set the 1930s and 1940s about racial prejudice, the American experiment, family, faith and sexuality.

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Melvin Tolson's “Harlem Gallery.”

A funny, fearless and densely layered poem (1960s super-critic Karl Shapiro said the "baroque" style used made it funnier and more ironic), Melvin B. Tolson's Harlem Gallery was first published in 1965, shortly before Tolson's death in 1966. Nearly 160 pages long, it showcases and comments upon a wide variety of humans living in that pulsating, screaming, dancing and crying New York City neighborhood from the time of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s through the 1950s.

Twenty years before Harlem Gallery, Tolson had finally found the widespread recognition and praise through his customary shorter and more conventional verse forms. But Harlem Gallery surprised readers and critics with its novelty and verve.

A separate poem was crafted for each human subject in the gallery, based on encounters and informal interviews Tolson conducted when he lived in New York for a full year. In each poem, however, Tolson, who was ethnically both African-American and native American, continued to opine about race, and about the difficulty of squaring the actual experiences of American minorities with the idea of equality promised by the American experiment. True, the form of Harlem Gallery suggests that it is as least loosely modeled on Edgar Lee Master's Spoon River Anthology--to which Tolson's steady parade of characters has been favorably compared. Tolson's gallery characters, however, speak the many colorful and often-warring dialects one could hear on the Harlem streets.

harlwm galeeryg.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Thinking on Your Own: The Holy Surprise of a Child's First Look.

He was a loner with an intimate bond to humanity, a rebel who was suffused with reverence. An imaginative, impertinent patent clerk became the mind reader of the creator of the universe, the locksmith of mysteries of the atom and the universe.

--Walter Issacson, in Einstein: His Life and Universe (Simon & Schuster, 2007)


Children come with Imagination. It's standard issue.

--Holden Oliver in 2009

tumblr_lj1jxdhkzc1qe6pjoo1_4001.jpg
"E" at the beach: Another fresh take.

Try this at home and work: The Holy Surprise of a Child's First Look. Forget for a moment, if you can, about Clients and Paris. This blog is at heart about Quality, Old Verities, and Values--the things no business, government, non-profit group, religion, politician or leader (a) wants to give you or (b) can give you. No, not even family and friends can. You have to find them on your own. Work and Service, whether you are paid for them or not, are inseparable from these things.

At the blog, at our firm, and in our lives, we seek--in the largest sense--serious overachievers, and aficionados of life, past and present: identifying them, learning from them, having them as friends, hiring them and above all, never holding them back. It is often hard to find these people--or even to remember that they once existed. We do, after all, live in a cookie-cutter world. Originality, intuition, authentic spirituality, and even taste are not valued--these traits are often feared and attacked--in most of the West. This is especially true in America, where we continue to be geographically, culturally and (some think) cosmically isolated. The United States, despite its successes, high standard of living and exciting possibilities, has become world headquarters of both moral pretension and dumbing life down. Besides, fresh thinking leads to painful recognitions. It's easier to let something else do the thinking for us.

"Fragmentation" is a word some people (including those with better credentials than the undersigned to write this) have used for decades to describe modern humans all over the world: lots of wonderful, intricate and even elegant pieces--but no whole. So, in our search for coherence, we look for clues. We look to television, advertising, and malls. To work, and to professional organizations. To secondary schools, universities, and any number of religions (none of the latter seem "special"--they say identical intuitive and common sense good things, but just say them differently), and to an array of other well-meaning institutions. In fairness, all of these have their moments (hey, we all like our insular clubs).

Continue reading...

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 14, 2020

Speakers' Corner, London: "Have a good summer, you Bastards...”

Since 1866, Speakers' Corner in London's Hyde Park (northeast corner near Marble Arch) has been important in Britain's demonstrations, protests and debate. In 1872, the area was specifically set aside for those purposes. Here are among the best and most eccentric daily shows in London. Marx, Lenin and Orwell all spoke at Speakers' Corner there on Sundays, the traditional speaking day. For the dark history of this area of Hyde Park as the execution place know as Tyburn Gallows for nearly six centuries--everyone condemned to die could make a final speech--see the website of the Royal Parks. Below: uncredited photo from a Sunday in 1930s.

speakers corner orators-at-hyde-park-corner-london-30s.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Bastille

“The Storming of the Bastille, July 14, 1789.” Jean-Pierre Houël, 1789.

E908529F-FBA0-4463-BE7B-0BFC542817D1.jpeg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

July 13, 2020

My Cultural Resume: Think for Yourself Much?

My Other CV: Dem then. GOP now. But always the same guy.

Over the years this blog has showcased a number of pet issues and themes. And apart from customer service, litigation strategies, lawyering abroad and cultural literacy. One of them has been the importance of thinking independently about law, government, politicians and political ideologies.

Or thinking about Anything. There are these days lots of good, and arguably "bad" notions and ideas--nationally and internationally--all along the political spectrum, and there is no reason to pick one party, camp or pol to follow on all ideas.

After all, people, not ideologies, solve public problems.

You don't need a label. You need not be a Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Anarchist or Nihilst. You can "mix and match" both pols and ideas. Me? I've changed, if subtly, and in ways that trouble a friend here and there. But my thinking is pretty much the same as it was when I was in my 20s. As a "liberal", I never trusted Big Labor. I've never liked the "politically correct" speech regimen many traditional liberals unfortunately embraced. To the contrary, I've always admired free speech--and I revel in it. But the main change is that last year I registered Republican for the first time. Not much else is different.

Most of us do have a Political-Civil Rights-Human Rights-Social Justice resume, CV or profile (hereinafter "Political CV"). I use "political" broadly here to describe anything related to participation in public affairs where some social purpose was fully served beyond my own self-aggrandizement, ego or pleasure. More than one purpose is okay; few of us do anything out a pure heart to "will one thing." So below I've fashioned my Political CV. Forget about Dem or GOP or Libertarian scripts. I've listed things that I did in large part "for the public good." For example, things I'm not including are Senior Class President (mix of duties and agendas), Eagle Scout (the same), working in a union-shop factory (Keebler's, in my case), membership in student or church groups with some but not primary political or social welfare slant, merely being asked to run for Congress (and saying no), merely voting, serving on an elected but non-partisan Zoning Board for a community of 40,000 or going to see Jerry Rubin, Timothy Leary or Milo speak at the Cow Palace. Or throwing a huge pickle at an on-stage Iggy Stooge (and hitting him).

But passing out leaflets for a political candidate, demonstrating against POTUS candidate and Alabama Governor George Wallace or working regularly with the urban homeless? Oh yeah. Those are "political". They reflected my idea of furthering "the public good" at the time I did I them. You get the idea. There's got to be a cause, some heat, some passion in an activity that helps others. Doesn't matter if it's a national issue or not. Doesn't matter if there's rhetoric involved.

Anyway, I've been an "activist" in everything I've ever done--and particularly with respect to groups I've joined or with which I've identified. So since I was 16, here is my political resume in chronological order. I'll update it as I remember things things:

1. Campaigned twice for Jerry Springer (Ohio-D), for runs for Congress and City Council in Cincinnati.

2. Campaigned more briefly but earnestly for Howard Metzenbaum, U.S. Senator (Ohio-D)

3. Worked with Armstrong United Methodist Church in Indian Hill, Ohio on several long-term projects for inner-city kids in Cincinnati, Ohio. Some with my mother (Head Start). Some in connection with working toward God & Country Award for BSA. (I was Boy Scout.)

4. Worked twice at as counselor at a camp for inner-city handicapped kids at summer camp in Cincinnati.

5. My party's candidate for 1970 Governor of Ohio Boys State. I was "liberal" party candidate and lost to a black kid from Sandusky. Ohio named Tony Harris. The race made news on television and in newspapers all over Ohio.

6. Student Reporter, Duke University Daily Chronicle. Civil Rights Beat, Durham. (1972-73)


Dan Hull 1976.jpg

7. Demonstrator, anti-Vietnam war movement. Several marches, demonstrations, including Moratorium in D.C. Demonstrated against POTUS candidate George C. Wallace.

8. Wrote "Soul City: A Dream--Will it come true?" feature for Duke daily Chronicle. March 1974. Interviewed among others Floyd McKissick, one of founders of Soul City, the first model black city in America. Paper won acclaim and 2 awards for this reporting.

9. Aide, Sen. Gaylord Nelson (Wis.-D) (1974-1975, parts of 1976) Spearheaded demonstration project passed in Congress in preventative health care for Menominee Indian tribes in Wisconsin.

10. Worked for Lawyers Committee Under CIvil Rights suing VA furniture makers under Title VII. Class action suit. Covington & Burling.

11. Worked off and on but actively for 2 years helping probe possible violations of Voting Rights Act by large Ohio city. Department of Justice/Legal Aid Society.

12. Awarded 1-year poverty law fellowship in Toledo, Ohio. Turned down to move back to DC.

IMG_0332.JPG

13. Test "husband" for "the white couple" for mortgage and leasing discrimination investigation conducted by HUD

14. Two of three law review articles on racial discrimination under Constitution. Zoning and Voting.

15. Two feature articles appearing in major paper Sunday magazine. First on zoning in a small Ohio River town, New Richmond, Ohio. Second about a 1st Amendment and zoning crusader named John Coyne in rural Clermont County, Ohio.

16. Aide, Representative Bill Gradison (R-Ohio) 1978-1981. Health. Energy. Natural Resources,

17. Treasurer 2003 State Assembly Campaign for CA Democrat, Karen Heumann.

18. Chief San Diego Fundraiser and (briefly) CA Convention Delegate. Wesley Clark for President (2003-2004)

19. Board of Directors, North San Diego County Democrats (2002-2012)

20. Hillary Clinton for President, 2008, 2016.

21. Co-Founded (with Peter B. Friedman) One Night/One Person Winter Homeless Program in Northern America & Europe 2015.

Original: April 3, 2019

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Karl Llewellyn

Llewellyn.jpg
Karl Nickerson Llewellyn

You expect me to tell you that you should be earnest about your work, and get your back into it for dear old Siwash, and that he who lets work slide will stumble by the way.

The above of course is from the opening chapter of the The Bramble Bush: On Our Law and Its Study (1931), which sprung from a series of introductory lectures Karl Llewellyn (1893–1962) gave to first-year law students during the 1929-30 academic year, when he was appointed the first Betts Professor of Jurisprudence at Columbia. The book's title is from a poem "The Bramble Bush" by Robert Penn Warren, excerpted here:

There was a man in our town
and he was wondrous wise:
he jumped into a bramble bush
and scratched out both his eyes--

and when he found that he was blind,
with all his might and maine,
He jumped into another one,
and scratched them in again.

0195368452.jpg

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)

Oh New York City you talk a lot...

You look like a city. You feel like a religion.

--L. Nyro, 1969

Five_Points_by_George_Catlin_1827.jpg

Five Points, George Catlin, 1827

U1394587.jpg

Foley Square, 1963 (Bettmann/CORBIS)

Posted by JD Hull. Permalink | Comments (0)